Steve Martaindale

Author of the JP Weiscarver Mystery Series

15. At work

striping

Painting new highway stripes in Ao Nang utilizes far fewer people and less machinery than in the United States.

I have mentioned a couple of times about the number of small shops that are run by families, often in front of their home.

This article touches on that while talking about the country’s “ridiculously low” unemployment rate.

My impression was that an awful lot of employment is simply grabbing bits of work or income wherever one can.

Be that as it may, here are some shots I grabbed around town of people at work.

Experience preferred

It was difficult to convey just what was happening here. See the bamboo ladder running up from the lower right corner? The man used it to get up to and climb among the highway of lines. Let’s just say OSHA would have a cow.

Small shop

Here is one of the small shops I was talking about. They seem to cater primarily to locals.

Fruit shake

This more polished-looking shop specializing in fruit shakes, on the other hand, is set up in the tourist area.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water delivery

Providing drinking water is a big deal. Here, a delivery team unloads jugs of fresh water in a commercial district.

Raking the park

More than once, we saw people, like this woman, raking leaves in a park.

Loading the boat

I have no idea what’s going on here except they were loading items from the pickup onto the long-tail boat. The water is in a canal only a hundred yards or so from the sea.

River bank maintenance

Behind the boat in the previous photo, these guys kept busy relocating mud along the canal wall. Well, that’s what it looked like they were doing.

Guide ham

But not all work is drudgery. Surely, there are things worse than paddling a kayak and hamming it up for a tourist’s photo.

 

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tsunami-sign

 

Proceed to 16. Tsunami

 

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